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PRODUCTIVITY is the one word Ben Kerin uses to describe the benefits of his Dorper flock.

"Dorpers convert herbage to meat efficiently and you can set your watch on their productive capabilities," he said.

"Seasons have no influence on their reproductive cycles.

"They readily rejoin with a lamb at foot at any time of the year and scanning percentages are always within a per cent or two of each other."

Mr Kerin and partner Katie Morrison run 1500 Dorper ewes and 80 Angus females on the 2000-hectare aggregation based on "Eden Valley", just west of Trundle with Mr Kerin's father, Barrie.

The Kerin family has been mixed-farmers in the district for more than a century and Barrie Kerin was one of the first in the district to become a dedicated meat sheep producer when he brought the first Poll Dorsets to Trundle in the 1970s.

The change from second-cross prime lamb production to straight Dorper began four to five years ago after Ben Kerin completed a holistic management course.

He had also noticed lamb buyers competing for Dorpers at Forbes saleyards where the British and Australian crossbred lamb pens were fetching just one bid.

"The course certainly changed my direction a little and dad has always had a willingness for change and supported me in the move," he said.

They gradually scaled back cropping, stopping two years ago, and have left paddocks to re-establish to natural pastures while moving into plan grazing with established water points and fencing.

"The beauty of Dorpers is they will convert to meat anything that grows," Mr Kerin said.

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